Saturday, February 15, 2014

EASY COLLAGE TECHNIQUE - FAST & SIMPLE

MIXED MEDIA -- 
A GRAPHIC TRANSPARENCY
ADDS IMPACT
A bold, high-contrast black and white photograph  (without grays) is best for this method. Print the transparency.
Select text, smaller imagery, and other papers in keeping with your subject-matter. Arrange them on a sturdy background, auditioning the transparency before you glue down the background. Consider your composition.
Because a busy, dark collage beneath the transparency will be too, too much, you must lighten portions of the papers with a gesso- or pale gouache-wash, or use white pastel. Let dry. The transparency will have more graphic punch, more of an impressive effect, if the collage underneath  it  doesn't "fight" with it.
Use your own favorite method for attaching the transparency. Some people just glue it at the edges, while others affix it with scrapbooking findings or other means.
collage, mixed-media
From a book by Paula Guhin

8 comments:

  1. Nice technique!
    Pretty cool looking.

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    1. Thanks much, Sue...so glad you like it.

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  2. Forgive my density--what does, "Print the transparency" mean? Print a high contrast photo on a transparent piece of paper, like vellum? Love the look.

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    1. You are not dense...I was just too brief! With an inkjet printer, you can use an inkjet transparency (but they are not cheap!) or you can have Office Max or some other business copy a black and white image from paper onto a transparency for you. Or you can use the vellum, as you said. OR even sheer tissue, but the sheet must be taped at the top so it goes through your inkjet printer okay, hopefully.
      Thanks for bringing it up, my dear.

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  3. Duh. I just realized what a transparency is. I needed the office supply reference to remember. I used to work in an office and had to make these all the time (for overhead projectors; old school). There are ones made specifically for inkjet printers, while others are for laser printers, or laser copiers. You definitely don't want to put the wrong kind into a laser machine, which uses heat to melt the toner onto the transparency. And the quality of the transparency can make a difference sometimes. Thanks for the tip on all the ways to get this need effect. I like it!

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  4. Love this, Paula! I have purchased collage sheet transparency's over the years from an online art supply site and I tended to hoard them because I didn't want to use them up. This was long before Etsy and all those places where you could find them anywhere. And it was before you could find a million vintage (or other) public domain images to print for yourself. After those places became more prevalent I finally bought some plain sheets to print my own. I got the heat resistant kind so if I want to emboss or whatever. I like using them on things like microscope slide (and other glass) jewelry, making little collages. I use my Xyron for attaching them. Thanks for the tip about using lighter colors if you are using a black and white transparency. Usually I have used color ones so I have to watch out for that in reverse. But, I really am liking your idea of the main image in black and white then adding the other elements in color. Another great "Paula idea!"

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    1. And another great comment by one of my fantastic followers. You are highly esteemed.

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  5. I have never used transparencies before, but I find a large book of sheet music at half price books and this would be a perfect project to use that in. Hopefully I can get the printing part right!

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